Barnsley Biodiversity Action Plan. DRAFT Last Updated August 2021

 Biodiversity

 Action

 Plan

Four Migratory Woodland Local Priority Bird Species

Woodland also supports migrant breeding birds, coming to Barnsley in the summer. Very small numbers of the migratory Tree Pipit and Wood Warbler still breed in the upland fringe woodlands and Pied and Spotted Flycatcher are becoming increasingly scarce. Their decline may also be due to issues on their migration routes or wintering grounds.

Spotted Flycatcher

UKBAP 2007 Priority Species

NERC Section 41 Species of Principal Importance

Red List

General protection W&C Act


Spotted Flycatcher, a streaky, grey-brown bird, darts out from a perch to catch flying insect prey mid-air.


In Barnsley, Spotted flycatcher is now scarce and local, mainly west of the M1


They are found in woodland with open glades, parks and mature gardens.


It eats large flying insects such as moths, butterflies  and craneflies.

Conservation measures


Local Priority Habitats

Mixed Deciduous Woodland

Open wooded parkland

Gardens with mature trees

They are migrant breeding birds arriving late April to early May.

They nest in tree cavities, on ledges and climbing plants, and use open-sided nest boxes.


Its decline may be due to poorer woodland quality, a lack of large flying insects and a loss of nesting habitat.


Predation mainly by Jay may be a factor, especially in woodland.

Spotted Flycatcher. Image: Ron Marshall

Conservation


Local Priority Habitats

Upland oakwood

Mixed deciduous woodland

Young & clear-fell plantations


The migrant Tree Pipit, arrives from mid April and nests on the ground from May to August.


Their decline may be due to issues on their migration routes or wintering grounds.  


It may also be due to changes in woodland structure with less management of wooded areas, plantations maturing, and the availability of ‘song-post’ trees.

Tree Pipit

UKBAP 2007 Priority Species

NERC Section 41 Species

Red List

General protection W&C Act

Tree pipits feed on the ground, but sing from  trees or bushes in a parachuting flight.


Scarce and possibly in decline in Barnsley, small numbers breed in open scrub or wooded places in upland areas.


They need trees in low densities and feed mainly on small insects and other invertebrates.

Conservation measures


Local Priority Habitat

Upland oakwood

Mixed deciduous woodland

Beech Plantations

A summer migrant, they are present from April to August.


Their breeding season begins in May. They nest close to the ground, usually in scrub.


Their decline may be due to issues on their migration routes or wintering grounds. Here they may be affected by changes in their woodland habitat


Wood Warbler

UKBAP 2007 Priority Species

NERC Section 41 Species

Red List

General protection W&C Act


It is a migrant breeding bird arriving in April to early May.


They mainly eat insects and caterpillars but also fruit and seeds in late summer.


They use cavities in mature trees for nesting and will readily use nest boxes.


The causes of its decline may involve a lack of insect prey, competition and predation.

Pied Flycatchers fly out from trees to catch insects.


The male, black above and white underneath, has a bold white patch on its folded wing. Females are browner.


In the Barnsley area, Pied Flycatcher is scarce and local to broadleaved woods close to the moorland fringe around Langsett and Wharncliffe.

Conservation measures


Local Priority Habitats

Mixed Deciduous Woodland in upland areas

[Upland Oakwood]

Pied Flycatcher

Red List

General protection W&C Act


Pied Flycatcher. Image: Ron Marshall

Wood Warblers have a yellow throat and eye stripe.


They are found in deciduous woodland under closed canopies with only a little shrub layer. 


Scarce and possibly in decline in Barnsley, small numbers breed in mature  oak  woods and beech plantations in upland areas.


They feed on insects & spiders.


Some images
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